New Music Bake Sale 2014 ~ Preview

Pictured: Hotel ElefantHotelElefant

The 5th annual New York edition of the New Music Bake Sale is happening tomorrow from 4-11 PM at Roulette in Brooklyn. Once again, some of the greats of the new music field in NY are on hand to deliver fabulous sets of music AND raise funds for the music community through an array of yummy baked treats (and some CDs as well). Tickets for this event are 10 dollars a piece (and you even get a raffle ticket with that), so please come on over!

Schedule:

4PM: Exapno members Amirtha Kidambi, Matthew Gantt, and Ellen O’Meara
5PM: Newspeak
6PM: Rhymes With Opera
7PM: ensemble, et al.
8PM: Hotel Elefant
9PM: Talea Ensemble
10PM: Contemporaneous

THE 5th NEW MUSIC BAKE SALE
Sunday, MARCH 16 2014: 4pm-11pm
Roulette
509 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn
(917) 267-0363
Tickets: $10

New Music Bake Sale (newmusicbakesale.org)

THE SNOW MELTS TO REVEAL NEW MUSIC ~ Review of A Night of New Music for Voice and Piano

Pictured below, from L to R: Heather Meyer, Robert S, Cohen, John Eaton, Christopher Berg, Daniel Neer, Peri Mauer, Debra Kaye, Jennifer Griffith, Patricia Leonard, Christopher Oldfather, Sharon Harms, Valerie Gonzalez.nightofnewmusic--groupphoto

New York Composers Circle
presents
New Music for Voice and Piano
St. Peter’s Church, NYC
March 6, 2014

Written by Ted Gorodetzky

Neither inches of unwelcome snow nor blustery winter temperatures can keep a good concert down. The proof was last week’s presentation of new music from the New York Composers Circle concert at Saint Peter’s Church in midtown Manhattan. Forced to reschedule from their original January date due to weather none of us now miss, all composers and performers were remarkably able to reassemble on March 6th for a stimulating and varied evening that featured three premieres amongst the program of New Music for Voice and Piano. Continue reading

The Danish String Quartet in Sedona ~ A Review

danish2

Chamber Music Sedona
presents
The Danish String Quartet
St John Vianney Church
Sedona, AZ
February 2, 2014

Here it is, my very first review from my new home in Sedona, AZ!

And how timely is it that this wonderful ensemble, the Danish String Quartet, have a show right on the weekend of my very first week being here? I could not have planned this any better!

And all people are talking about otherwise on this day was the Super Bowl ;) I couldn’t even see it anyway since the place I was staying at didn’t have cable.

St. John Vianney Church at first seemed like a very unlikely place for a progressive chamber concert, but remembering having seen Lisa Moore doing
something considerably more experimental at a previous event at a NY church, it then felt like the norm. Continue reading

Lawler + Fadoul ~ On Prelude Cocktail and Related Things

Left, Zara Lawler, flute; right, Paul Fadoul, marimbaslider-2

The flute and marimba duo Lawler + Fadoul had a few mintues to discuss their CD Prelude Cocktail, which you folks should most certainly pick up, it is a really cool collection of preludes transcribed for the 2 instruments by these very gifted artists.

You can purchase/download the album here or on the link on the bottom.

CM: I want to start off by saying I was quite blown away by this album, it sounds incredible! The thing is, I really enjoy hearing the art of transcription–It’s so special, and some people are probably wondering how it’s so special when it’s music that already exists, but it just gives a whole other sound to something. And these pieces you guys did are mostly written for the piano–Of course, I love the piano, but it has this really cool, sort of chimey elegance with the marimba. And the flute takes up the melody. It’s a nice, fresh approach. BTW, I feel like I just said everything you were going to say, so forgive me…

[all laughing]

Zara: That’s ok, I don’t think we would have come up with the phrase “chimey elegance”, but…

Paul: We like “chimey elegance”! Continue reading

Alex Temple ~ On Her Upcoming Podcast Opera End

Chicago-based composer Alex Temple, whose music you should certainly check out on her website, has a piece coming out titled End that will be of great interest to those of you that might have an awareness of a phenomenon known as “closing logos” (or “scary logos”). Readers of The Glass are definitely familiar with these from my coverage of Eric Siday’s work as well as my interview with filmmaker Rodney Ascher about his short The S From Hell. End is an operatic take on the scary logo phenomenon, and as an interesting twist, the work will be presented as a 3-part podcast–the premiere dates have yet to be announced, so please be on the lookout for them.

In the meantime, Alex has another work premiering at NY’s Cell Theater on December 20th at 8 PM titled Switch: A Science-Fiction Micro-Opera that will be part of an evening program titled Den of Death, featuring the Cadillac Moon Ensemble and other works by Matt Marks, Melody Loveless and Viet Cuong. Click here or the link at the bottom for info/tickets. Continue reading

Kendra Emery ~ On The Banglewood Experience and Related Things

Kendra Emery performing at the Bang On a Can Summer Festival in North Adams, MA; July 2013 (Photo courtesy of Ivan Singer)kendraemeryivansinger

Saxophonist Kendra Emery is a musician I very recently met in the audience at this year’s Bang On a Can marathon in NY this past June, and at the time I had no idea she was going to be selected as one of the fellows appearing at the Summer festival at MASS MoCA the following month. During that period, I noticed lots of interesting activity in music and clips being posted online from the events that took place, and suddenly it seemed that she was among lots of great influences, and was becoming one of the most up-front individuals participating at the festival. An article that was picked up by Rolling Stone even covered this event, which surely must have attracted some audience members from outside the culture. Since then, she has updated her website and she’s commissioning new works, and even recording her own improvs (You can hear them either on her webpage or on her Soundcloud page). Continue reading

Battery ~ Randy Woolf and Kathleen Supove Kickstarting a Kickboxing Piece

Randall Woolf and Kathleen Supove–Photo courtesy of Randall Woolfrandywoolfkathysupove

Composer Randy Woolf and his wife pianist Kathleen Supove have made many interesting collaborative efforts together, but this one will probably be very hard to beat. They have been working on Battery, a concerto for piano and orchestra–a different kind of piano concerto that involves choreographed boxing. Sounds crazy in print, but if you take a look at what Kathleen does in the video link below, you’ll see she’s up for the boxing aspect of the task as well as the piano one.

The premiere of Battery will take place Feb 23, 2014, and the folks that are working with Randy and Kathy are choreographer Heidi Latsky and ensemble Le Train Bleu, with conductor Ransom Wilson. The funds of the campaign will be going to them.
Click here or on one of the bottom links to contribute.

Randy and Kathy had a minute to talk to us about it. Continue reading

Gregg Kallor at Subculture ~ Concert Preview

Photo courtesy of Steve PoolGregg Kallor - Steve Pool

Courtesy of Two Sheps That Pass

Gregg Kallor is the recipient of an Aaron Copland Award for composition. One of ten composers nationwide selected for this prestigious residency, Kallor composed a concerto for piano and orchestra during his time at the home of the late eminent American composer. He also began several chamber music pieces while he was there, including “Undercurrent” for cello and piano – which he will premiere at SubCulture tonight at 7:30 PM with Laura Metcalf (cello).

Kallor’s new album, A Single Noon, is a nine-movement piano suite – a musical tableau of life in New York City told through a combination of classical composition and improvisation. Kallor premiered the suite at Carnegie Hall in 2011. Five-time GRAMMY®-nominee Fred Hersch calls it “the work of an extraordinary pianist, a composer of great distinction and a true conceptualist… this ambitious and unique suite really takes us somewhere that is very deeply heartfelt and dazzlingly executed. This is 21st-century music that has clearly absorbed the past and looks to a bright and borderless musical future.”

Kallor’s first music video, “Espresso Nirvana” (think caffeinated hijinks), is set to the sixth movement of the suite. His new music video, “Broken Sentences” (set to the 2nd movement), will be released tonight at SubCulture. It celebrates one of the most exciting public arts programs in NYC: the Sing For Hope Pianos – 88 artist-designed pianos that were placed in public spaces all around the 5 boroughs for anyone to play. Art for all.

Trailer for “Broken Sentences”

Gregg Kallor
SubCulture, 45 Bleecker St, Downstairs
7:30pm
$20

ETHEL ~ On Documerica and Related Things

ETHEL are L-R: Ralph Farris, viola; Tema Watstein, violin; Kip Jones, violin; Dorothy Lawson, cello; Photo courtesy of Stephanie Berger 9101612096_c9f4147912_k

The great NY ensemble ETHEL had a few minutes to sit down and chat about the current tour and their stage project Documerica, which will be presented this coming October 2nd through the 5th at BAM (Click here for info).

CM:  I’ve interviewed some of the former members of ETHEL separately, and also Kip and Tema separately last year when you guys just joined. What has it been like these days for the group? You’ve been together 16 years?

Dorothy: We’re getting into our 16th season, I think, yes!

Ralph: But it feels like 17! [laughs] Continue reading

Rebekah Heller at Spectrum ~ A Review

Photo courtesy of Glenn Cornettrebekahhellerspectrum

International Contemporary Ensemble
presents
Rebekah Heller, bassoon
Spectrum, NYC
Saturday, August 24th, 2013

The set ICE bassoonist Rebekah Heller put on for her CD-release party for the solo disc 100 Names at NYC’s Spectrum was a great collection of stark but robust compositions, all of which were from the disc. The live performances were quite identical in sound, but to see Ms. Heller at work giving the most experimental bassoon concert I certainly have ever seen in my lifetime was a treat to savor for many ages.

After an introduction by her ICE colleague, flutist Claire Chase (who produced the album), Heller started the program with Edgar Guzman’s “∞¿?”, a piece where the bassoon is interchanging and blending with a recorded buzz feedback in such a perfect pitch you almost can’t hear where one ends and the other begins.

Another favorite moment was Marcelo Toledo’s “Qualla II”, a piece that brilliantly displays what sounds like the ICE ethic at work. Like Claire Chase, Rebekah Heller uses every fiber of her being to extract the most primal noise from a traditional classical instrument and rebrands it for the new music world. Between the rapid keyboard fingering with and without notes, and the animalistic sounds Heller puts back into the instrument, the work bears the earmarks of an outstanding signature piece for the soloist.
Marcos Balter’s “…and also a fountain” continues the primal sounds with the addition of spoken word from Heller, while accompanying herself with ambient percussion.

The piece that wrapped up the evening’s program (“10pm, Ixtab”) was a chaotic duet with its composer, Du Yun on vocals. Heller ends it with a marvelous sequence of extended notes.

Rebekah Heller (Her artist’s page on ICEorg.org)